Treatment trials: Restylane vs. Botox

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Treatment trials: Restylane vs. Botox

Does talk of skin plumpers and wrinkle smoothers send your head into a spin? Do you know the difference between Botox and Restalyne? Whether injectables and fillers take your fancy or not, we’ve made it our duty to fill you in on the facts about fillers and face fixers so that you can make an informed decision.

Thinking about firming your face or smoothing out those creases? You’d do well to read on before taking the plunge as we give you the facts, thanks to some help from our experts, Matty Samaei from Karma Medispa, Anita Lee from the Total Body Clinic and Avana, as well as Anna Rua from the Purist Company…

Botox

Ahh… the ‘B’ word, so commonly questioned. Do you or don’t you comes down to individual choice but so long as it’s on offer, it’s imperative be informed. Here’s our hypothetical Q&A.

So firstly, what is Botox?

Botox is a protein derived from botulism toxin, which is a natural, purified protein extracted from bacteria.
Botox is one of the many trade names for the neurotoxic protein called botulinum toxin that is produced by the bacterium clostridium botulinum.

How does it work?

Botox is a muscle relaxant that works to relax the contraction of muscles by blocking nerve impulses. The result is muscles that can no longer contract, and so the wrinkles relax and soften over the top.

Why do people want it?

It’s an instant alternative to a face-lift, less invasive and less costly.

How long does it last?

The effect typically lasts three to six months, depending on the individual and repeated injections will have a cumulative effect. Results will wear off progressively and you will generally need to repeat the injections two to three times a year to maintain the results.

Where can it be used?

Between the brows, around the eye area, forehead, around the mouth, nose, chin area, and for other applications like excessive perspiration and migraines.

What about side effects?

Research from the Total Body Clinic and Avana states that 1% of people undergoing treatment will experience headaches.
There is the possibility of mild temporary bruising at the site of the injection, as well as a slight weakness of the eye muscle or asymmetry in the tested area, however according the same research, these side effects only occur approximately in 1 per 500 cases.

Who shouldn’t experience this treatment?

Those with neurological or muscular diseases should not attempt these treatments, likewise with pregnant and breastfeeding women.

Restylane

Fillers, they’re a little more commonly accepted in society – but still not entirely understood. We take a dive in dermal fillers and bring you the dirt.

So firstly, what is restylane?

Dermal fillers consist of non-animal stabilised hyaluronic acid (NASHA). This is a
complex sugar chain, which strongly binds water and is naturally found in human skin.

How does it work?

Restylane is a crystal-clear gel produced biotechnologically using stabilized, non-animal hyaluronic acid and water. The hyaluronic acid is a tissue-friendly substance closely resembling the hyaluronic acid that occurs naturally in the body. By replenishing nature’s supply of hyaluronic acid, Restylane revitalizes and plumps up the skin, instantly diminishing the appearance of lines and giving a softer look. Also known as a ‘dermal filler’, Restylane is used to create volume in the upper layer of the skin, for the treatment of facial folds, lines, wrinkles, depressed scars and to enlarge and reshape the lips.

Why do people want it?

Restylane is considered non-toxic as it contains hyaluronic acid (produced naturally in the body) and does not affect facial expression as Botox does. Hyaluronic acid is naturally occurring in the human body, a fact that makes this treatment attractive to those who worry about synthetic options and their potential effects.
Restylane can instantly soften tell-tale ageing lines or improve your looks by enhancing your natural features, such as your cheeks or lips. Restalyne restores volume, improves skin elasticity, and smooths niggling lines and imperfections. It is long lasting but not permanent.

How long does it last?

The duration of effect varies from client to client and area treated. The average time for the first “top up treatment” is three months with a range of one to six months. Once the area is fully filled the effect can last six to twelve months depending on the area and product used. Occasionally a client will find that the product wears off extremely quickly. The cause of this phenomenon is not understood but is very uncommon.

Where can it be used?

Nose to the angle of the mouth, lips, cheeks and chin, back of hands, décolletage, face and between the eyebrows.

What about side effects?

Side effects are generally rare and most are very mild and short lived. A small number of people (1 per 1000 cases) may experience prolonged redness and swelling, requiring two or three days of oral cortisone treatment.

Who shouldn’t experience this treatment?

Pregnant and breastfeeding women should stay away from this treatment, likewise with people suffering from keloid scarring. Those with cold sores should be aware that the sores may be aggravated if they’re located near the treatment area.
Restylane should not be used in or near skin sites where there are or have been active skin disease, inflammation or related conditions and should not be injected into an area where a permanent implant has been placed.

So there are the facts… take into account everything you’ve read, but do keep in mind that we all age, all you can do is try to guide the way your skin reacts to ageing. It’s also important to remember that neither treatment prevents wrinkles.

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